Jun
18
2010
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I’m going to make this post as straight and to the point as possible.  I was asked a couple of days ago what do I think about eating red meat.

 

First off, I admit I do on occasion consume red meat.  When I do, I try to make sure it is a free-range or organic lean steak.  That being said, understand that red meat is not for everyone. 

What's interesting is that as I sat and really gave thought to this question I realized the question is not so much about "eating red meat" as much as it is about the choices we make regarding food quality.

As you know, I don’t believe in one size fits all when it comes to nutrition.  Everyone is unique in their genetic make-up, activity level, and tastes, and thus have different tolerance levels and even allergies to certain types of foods.

There are 3 MAJOR concerns I have when discussing food choices, nutrition strategies, or "diets".

 

1.) What is your blood work telling you? Knowing your genetics/family history is a good indicator regarding what types of foods will or will not work with your body. Your blood work is a good indicator as to whether the food choices you are making are either helping or hurting your body. Be aware of how you feel after eating.

 

2.) How active are you each day? The body is a survival machine.  We were built to be active.  We spent hundreds of years running, jumping, climbing, avoiding predators, hunting for food and generally being active from sun up to sun down.  This activity level in addition to the climate largely dictated what types of foods were available to our ancestors.

 

3.) What kind of food quality choices do you make? Now in the age of convenience, highly processed foods, and a largely sedentary population, what is acceptable and healthy nutrition becomes a bit more tricky. When choosing a protein source, it should be a lean protein source that is either free-range or organically grown.

 

What I’m trying to communicate is that if you follow the previous outline I provided on how to construct your meals AND engage in challenging exercise 4-5 times/week, you will be able to tell very quickly which types of foods work for your body and which do not.

     

    It is not so much the food type that is the issue in this day and age, it is the way the food is produced that is really more of the problem.  Food raised and processed in unsanitary conditions is no good for anyone.  At the same time understand it is the WAY the food is produced, NOT the food itself that is the issue. I mean really, when you were a kid, did you ever think you would have to pay to have clean water to drink. Times and activity levels have changed and so must the way we chose the food we put in our bodies.

    Don't forget the blog post in which I discussed how you should construct your meals each day.  Here’s the link to refresh your memory (tips for constructing your meals).

    So, to keep it simple, make food choices that are as natural as possible.


    *Chose free-range or organic whenever possible,
    *Remember to keep your leafy green vegetable servings high and
    *Minimize your starchy carb intake, and for goodness sake
    *Get out there be as active as you can to help your body process the food you have taken in.

       

      As always, let me know if this information was helpful.